Posts Tagged ‘prevention’

Pet Poisoning Prevention

August 27, 2013

Poisoning cases are some of the most common reasons for visits to veterinary emergency clinics. Nearly every day, we field a call or see a patient that has eaten something they shouldn’t and must then receive life-saving treatment.Pet Poisons

It’s even worse when you realize that most of these incidents are completely preventable. It doesn’t have to be like this. Most of the time owners don’t even realize that their homes contain so many toxic items. Some of the most toxic items include:

Household cleaners, bleach, Lysol and other corrosives… why? 

Because household cleaners can cause very serious “chemical burns”.  Most often, these chemicals are ingested or licked, causing a caustic or corrosive burn usually affecting the tongue and esophagus. 

Aspirin…why?

Aspirin interferes with platelets, which are responsible for helping the blood to clot.  Aspirin toxicity can lead to gastrointestinal problems, respiratory difficulties, neurological problems, bleeding disorders and kidney failure.

Antifreeze…why?

Ethylene glycol (antifreeze) is extremely toxic for pets and has potentially lethal effects…even a small dose can be lethal within a few hours of ingestion.  

Amphetamines…why?

If left untreated, amphetamine toxicity can be fatal in your pet.  These classification of drugs affect your pet’s nervous system and brain.  Toxic signs are typically visible within 1-2 hours.

While this list is not exhaustive, it does cover some of the more common substances that are particularly harmful to your pet.  If you are ever in doubt about your pet’s exposure to these and other potentially harmful products, don’t hesitate to contact us at (614) 888-4050.

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After watching this video, I’ll NEVER miss a dose of Flea prevention medication again!

August 21, 2012

 

Did you know?  …
The cat flea is actually the most common flea in North America, although the dog, human, and sticktight fleas are also extremely common. Fleas commonly attach themselves to dogs, cats, humans, chickens, rabbits, squirrels, rats, mice and other domesticated or wild animals.

The female flea lays her eggs on the surface hair of the host. Eggs then drop from the host and can infest carpets, bedding and furniture, hatching into larvae within 14 days. Flea larvae avoid light and feed on organic matter found within cracks and crevices. Usually within 18 days, larvae enter the pupal stage by constructing small, cocoon-like structures around themselves. Approximately two weeks later, adult fleas emerge and begin to search for food sources. Fleas establish large populations where pets and other animals, such as livestock, are present.  Multiple treatment methods are often employed to eradicate a flea population. Check this out…  For more information on the lifecycle of a Flea, click on the following link:  http://vettv.net/video/7497Image

Pets suffering from flea bites scratch themselves incessantly. Fleas also feed on humans and some people exhibit flea allergies. Fleas may also carry human diseases such as typhus and tularemia.  After watching this video and learning more about fleas… I’ll never miss providing my pets (and my family) with preventive medication and protection again!