Posts Tagged ‘canine’

Getting old is not fun!

October 7, 2013

When we bring home a new puppy (or even adopt an older dog), we are excited to add a new member family and never consider that they, too, will grow old one day.  Every dog ages differently, but there are a few changes that veterinarians tend to see in older dogs. Some of these common signs of canine aging include:older dogs

  • Hearing loss:   As dogs age, the nerve cells and hearing apparatus degenerates, resulting in a slow loss of hearing.
  • Vision loss:   The lens of the eye becomes cloudy with age. Natural changes result in lenticular sclerosis, which typically does not cause significant vision loss. However, cataracts may develop, which also interferes with vision.
  • Decreased activity:   As dogs age, their metabolic rate slows and as a result, they become less active.
  • Weight gain:   Elderly dogs require 30 to 40 percent fewer calories. So simply eating a normal maintenance diet, often causes obesity.
  • Infections:   As the body ages, the immune system weakens, making it harder for your dog to ward off infections.

All of these changes are common as dogs age and with careful attention from a loving owner, they are easy to manage. It’s very important to maintain good routine care in your dog’s golden years and have your dog evaluated twice annually by the veterinarian.

Dental health affects overall health for your pets

August 14, 2013

Halitosis, or bad breath, is the most common sign of dental disease. Classic “doggy breath” is not necessarily normal. It’s usually caused by an infection of the gums and potentially the other canine dental healthsupporting structures of the teeth. Plaque builds up every day on the tooth surface including at the gum line. Left in place, the plaque can mineralize, or harden, in less than 2 days. The brown, grey, or yellow staining commonly seen near the gum line is a sign of advancing disease. Signs of dental disease include:

  • bad bath
  • red inflamed gums
  • loose teeth
  • tartar accumulation
  • calculus on the teeth.

Dental disease is the most common ailment affecting pet dogs and cats and affects more than just their dental health.

The amount and severity of dental disease in our pets can be very surprising. The  best way to reduce the risk of dental disease in pets is proper dental care. A simple and quick tooth brushing just 3 times a week can add years to your dog’s life, but the sad fact is that most dogs never even see a toothbrush.  We have made it even easier and more affordable for our clients to take great care of their favorite furry friends.  Not only do we offer a FREE dental examination…just call us at (614) 888-4050 and we’ll be happy to schedule that appointment… but we also offer a cost effective option for dental cleanings for your pet.

BUDGET Friendly Dental Cleanings

Our clients know how important dental health is for their pets and we want to make that more affordable as well.  For cats and dogs up to 6 years of age, dental cleanings start at $125!

(Prices for all procedures may be adjusted based upon the weight of your pet as the amount of anesthesia utilized will vary based upon weight).

Protect your pets!

August 2, 2013

canine fluThe canine flu virus has existed for several years.  It first received media attention after an article, published in September of 2005, explored the “Transmission of Equine Influenza Virus to Dogs”.  Further national media attention was given to the virus in 2009 when it was discovered that the virus was causing illness and death in dogs at Florida Greyhound tracks and then spreading to other dogs across the country.

What is Canine Flu?  It is a highly contagious respiratory infection of dogs.  What are the symptoms?  The virus can cause coughing, sneezing, nasal discharge, high fevers, eye discharge and, possibly, fatal pneumonia.

It has been supported that 80% of dogs exposed to the virus will develop an infection.  Most canine companions will experience only mild coughing; however, puppies and senior dogs are a greatest risk for fatalities associated with the virus.  The number of dogs at risk from actually dying from the virus is estimated at anywhere between 1 and 10%.

Who is at risk?  Dogs housed in high-density population areas or boarding kennels are at increased risk.  The virus has been documented in shelters, veterinary clinics, pet stores, boarding/kennel facilities and dog tracks.

What can the H3N8 dog vaccine do to protect my pet?  We hear this question many times each week from our clients who are opting to board their pets at the Animal Hospital of Polaris.  Our clients like to do everything they can to protect their pets but also want to minimize the risk of complications associated with vaccination.  They also want to avoid any unnecessary expenses.  We still recommend the vaccine (and require it) if you are boarding your dog at our extended stay kennel facility.  There are just some risks that we don’t wish to take with the health of your pet or any other pet.  We believe the canine influenza vaccine is beneficial.  The only exception might be if your dog is never boarded, is mostly in the house and does not interact with other dogs.  Vaccination could be very beneficial if your pet were exposed and may help to prevent the spread of this nasty and contagious virus.