Author Archive

We are very fortunate…

March 25, 2015

dog-cage-24At the Animal Hospital of Polaris, our pet owners are very concerned about the physical and mental well-being of their pets.  Often, their generosity extends beyond their own household.  If your house is already full of love (and puppies), and yet you still want to engage in charitable work that benefits our four-legged friends, consider the following ways you can help the various shelters and rescue missions in your area.

1. Put a donation box in your workplace. An empty box for donations can inspire others to help as well. Food, collars, toys, that fancy bed that your dog won’t look twice at…all of them can be used by a pet in need. If your company allows, try spreading the word via email or a flyer. (Be sure to drop the donations off to a dog shelter as soon as possible and thank your coworkers when you’re done.)

2. Collect old towels. Worn out towels and blankets are in high demand at shelters. Not only do they help make a cold, sterile cage more comforting, but they are easy to wash and replace for shelter staff.

3. Make some simple dog toys and donate them. The Internet is full of simple patterns for basic dog toys that pooches love. For under $20 you can make enough toys to keep a number of dogs very happy.

4. Volunteer to play with the pooches. Yes, really! Socialization is a very important part of canine development. Many shelters lack adequate volunteers for cleaning and socializing, so it’s worth contacting them to see if they have any volunteer slots free. Even once a month makes a difference.

5. Hold a dog toy drive. For your next party, consider asking guests to bring a small dog toy or other pet-related item for donation. The dogs will appreciate it, and it will make you feel better than traditional host or hostess gifts.

6. Foster. There is always a need to foster puppies or dogs. You can find out more details from your favorite local shelter.

7. Volunteer for a Trap-Neuter-Release program. These programs help reduce the feral dog population by humanely trapping stray dogs, neutering/spaying them, and releasing them to their original territory. By stopping the cycle of feral dog reproduction, you can do a world of good for dogs everywhere. Look for local TNR groups or animal welfare programs for more information.

8. Take photos for shelters. Got an eye behind the lens? Help homeless dogs by photographing them for adoption programs. Dogs who look happy and comfortable in their adoption photos are adopted much more quickly than ones who look scared or unfriendly…or who have no photo at all. See if your local shelter will let you take some Facebook-friendly photos for their use and help more dogs find their forever homes.

9. Put your change to work. At the end of every day, take all those spare pennies and nickels in your pockets and put them into a change jar. At the end of the month, cash it in at a change machine and donate to your favorite shelter. A few cents a day might not seem like much but every little bit helps.

10. Donate while you shop. Some programs such as Amazon Smile will donate a percentage of your purchase to the charity of your choice. If you do a lot of shopping online this is a great way to help shelter animals at the same time.

Dog_Vacation_1 2Spring Break is almost here…
If you are headed towards sand and sun for Spring Break and need a happy home for your pet during your vacation, give us a call at (614) 888-4050 to make a reservation for your dog, cat or even your exotic pet!  We will keep them company while you escape for some fun!

Getting old is not fun!

February 23, 2015
old_dog
When we bring home a new puppy (or even adopt an older dog), we are excited to add a new member family and never consider that they, too, will grow old one day.  Every dog ages differently, but there are a few changes that veterinarians tend to see in older dogs. Some of these common signs of canine aging include:
  • Hearing loss:   As dogs age, the nerve cells and hearing apparatus degenerates, resulting in a slow loss of hearing.
  • Vision loss:   The lens of the eye becomes cloudy with age. Natural changes result in lenticular sclerosis, which typically does not cause significant vision loss. However, cataracts may develop, which also interferes with vision.
  • Decreased activity:   As dogs age, their metabolic rate slows and as a result, they become less active.
  • Weight gain:   Elderly dogs require 30 to 40 percent fewer calories. So simply eating a normal maintenance diet, often causes obesity.
  • Infections:   As the body ages, the immune system weakens, making it harder for your dog to ward off infections. 
All of these changes are common as dogs age and with careful attention from a loving owner, they are easy to manage. It’s very important to maintain good routine care in your dog’s golden years and have your dog evaluated twice annually by the veterinarian. 

Winter weather and your pet…

February 23, 2015
snow_pic-300x199 2

Dogs-in-The-White-Stuff-1Winter and cold weather seem to sneak up on us. One minute you’re bundling up for a walk and before you know it you’re spending all your time indoors with your pets. The season brings its own host of issues: cold, ice, boredom, and a lack of exercise.
There are benefits from winter such as fewer fleas and mosquitoes outside. However, we recommend year-round flea and heartworm prevention because the lack of consistency in the weather.
Winter doesn’t have to be agony for you and your pet, though. Certain breeds of dogs naturally do very well in cold climates and are quite happy with a little extra preparation. Don’t forget to look after your dog’s paws as temperatures drop; freezing pavement and harsh road salt can take a real toll on their sensitive skin.

It’s the month of love! Hugs! Kisses!

February 23, 2015

Hearts-2-Red 2

If your pet’s bad breath makes them positively un-kissable,
it’s time schedule their yearly dental checkup today

It’s that time of year again. A month about love, hugs, kisses and chocolate. And when it comes to your pet, 3 out of 4 of those come out way on top! (Chocolate is a no-no, but you already knew that!)

What if your pet’s bad breath makes them positively un-kissable? Bad breath may mean there is an issue with your pet’s teeth and gums. But it may also be a sign of a more serious medical condition. Either way, if dental conditions are left untreated, you may put your pet at risk for problems in their mouth (periodontitis) or with internal organs (heart disease). The challenge most pet owners face is that even if their pet’s breath smells fine, some dental conditions are hard to spot.

happy-smiling-dogKeeping your pet healthy from toe to tooth shows the world how much you love them. What is the best way to keep your pet in tiptop shape?

Schedule your pet’s yearly checkup with us. We’ll do a thorough checkup, including a dental exam, to make sure your pet is at optimum health. We’re committed to your pet’s well being every step of the way. (Because we love them too!) Book their appointment today!

Your friends @
the Animal Hospital of Polaris
www.animalhospitalofpolaris.com
8928 South Old State Road
Lewis Center, Ohio  43035
614-888-4050

                          Hours of operation:                         
Monday – Friday 7:00 am – 7:30 pm
Saturday 8:00 am – 4:00 pm
Boarding pick ups and drop offs will be between 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Sunday:  10:00 am – 3 pm
Boarding pick ups and drop offs will be between 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

How Do Dogs Get Ebola?

Dogs and other animals pick up Ebola from consuming infected meat, direct contact with infectious fluids such as urine, feces.

Dogs are kept as pets and for hunting in Africa but are not typically fed, therefore they scavenge and ingest infected meat or residue from infected people. The very detailed CDC study found evidence of infection in dogs by testing hundreds of blood samples for antibodies.

What are Symptoms of Ebola in Dogs?

The CDC concluded that infected dogs are asymptomatic (do not develop symptoms) from Ebola. During the initial time of their infection, however, they can spread the disease to humans and other animals through licking, biting, grooming, saliva, tears, urine, and feces. However, once the virus is cleared from the dog it is no longer contagious. Dogs do not die from Ebola infections.

Can MY Dog Get Ebola?

In the United States and areas of the world not contiguous to the affected countries in central Africa, the chances of contracting Ebola are extremely low.

The virus is spread mainly in the current prevalent areas where the lifestyle is far different from ours. There is no known source of infection outside of affected areas in Africa. In our country, and most countries with more stringent rules concerning food production and sanitation, our pets should be protected as well as we are from this type of catastrophic disease. – See more at:http://www.petplace.com/dogs/ebola-virus-can-your-dog-get-it/page1.aspx?utm_source=Newsletters&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Ebola&utm_content=DL-20140912%20(1)#sthash.oc79ZEa6.dpuf


How Do Dogs Get Ebola?

Dogs and other animals pick up Ebola from consuming infected meat, direct contact with infectious fluids such as urine, feces.

Dogs are kept as pets and for hunting in Africa but are not typically fed, therefore they scavenge and ingest infected meat or residue from infected people. The very detailed CDC study found evidence of infection in dogs by testing hundreds of blood samples for antibodies.

What are Symptoms of Ebola in Dogs?

The CDC concluded that infected dogs are asymptomatic (do not develop symptoms) from Ebola. During the initial time of their infection, however, they can spread the disease to humans and other animals through licking, biting, grooming, saliva, tears, urine, and feces. However, once the virus is cleared from the dog it is no longer contagious. Dogs do not die from Ebola infections.

Can MY Dog Get Ebola?

In the United States and areas of the world not contiguous to the affected countries in central Africa, the chances of contracting Ebola are extremely low.

The virus is spread mainly in the current prevalent areas where the lifestyle is far different from ours. There is no known source of infection outside of affected areas in Africa. In our country, and most countries with more stringent rules concerning food production and sanitation, our pets should be protected as well as we are from this type of catastrophic disease. – See more at: http://www.petplace.com/dogs/ebola-virus-can-your-dog-get-it/page1.aspx?utm_source=Newsletters&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Ebola&utm_content=DL-20140912%20(1)#sthash.oc79ZEa6.dpuf

  Doggie daycare…another way to keep your pet active!

Because we have a max capacity of dogs per day, you can rest easy knowing that your pup will receive plenty of personal attention and loving care. All of our staff are certified in canine first aid and CPR, fully insured, and trained in safety protocols!

Do you spend long hours each day away at work only to return home to a moping dog?

For busy pet owners, finding a doggie day care center where pets can be cared for and loved can be a daunting task. You need a facility that provides a safe and secure environment where dogs will thrive.

You want animal caregivers that are not only professionally trained, but will treat your dogs with genuine affection. You want a place where dogs have sufficient social interaction, stimulation, and exercise to keep those furry tails wagging happily.

Fortunately for dog owners, the Animal Hospital of Polaris offers all this and more. We are the premier dog day care facility inthe Central Ohio area. Owners have had nothing but praises for our staff and services since we opened our doors in in 2002–and we know that the dogs feel the same.


$25 referral bonus for you and your referred client!

Thank you for trusting Animal Hospital of Polaris with your family pet!  We hope you’ll share what we do with others. Animal Hospital of Polaris offers a referral bonus for those existing clients who refer their friends, family or co-workers to our practice.  We offer a $25.00 Account Credit on both the referring client’s account as well as for the new client.

Please note that the referring client may utilize their $25.00 account credit for any product or service; however, the referred (new) client may only utilize their credit for clinical services.  In addition, the new client must complete a referral card at the time of service.  No coupon is needed to take advantage of this offer.  Thanks again for choosing Animal Hospital of Polaris!
Beyond ExPETation

February 23, 2015

February 23, 2015

5 Quick Tips to Keeping Your Pets Health!

There are a lot of things dog owners do correctly but often there are a few things they could do better. We have some important tips on how you can make your dog healthier.dogs-smiling_00052388

1. Take a good look at your dog every day. Is your dog walking OK? Eating OK? Vomiting? Having normal bowel movements? Pet owners that really monitor their dogs can usually diagnosis problems early.

2. Keep your dog on flea control and heartworm prevention medications ALL YEAR LONG. These medications are created to protect your dog from annoying and potentially dangerous problems. These medications are easy to give relative to the dangerous and even deadly problems they can create.

3. Give your dog plenty of time and exercise. If you make the commitment to have a dog, you need to ensure you are spending time with your dog and giving him or her plenty of attention. For some – this is no problem. For others – it is. Even on busy days – it is important to spend at least 15 minutes with your favorite buddy taking a walk, playing with a favorite toy or just enjoying a good head rub.

4. Keep your dog a healthy weight. Obese dogs really have more problems than dogs at an ideal weight. Dogs at an ideal weight feel better, have less medical problems and are, in general, much healthier. Is your dog too fat? Have you ever lost weight and just felt better about yourself? Dogs feel the same way!

5.Schedule your pet’s yearly dental cleaning with us. Their dental health is so very important.  If we didn’t think oral health was important, we wouldn’t have our teeth professionally cleaned TWICE per year!

We’re committed to your pet’s well being every step of the way. (Because we love them too!) Book their appointment today!

Your friends @
the Animal Hospital of Polaris
http://www.animalhospitalofpolaris.com
8928 South Old State Road
Lewis Center, Ohio  43035
614-888-4050

                          Hours of operation:                         
Monday – Friday 7:00 am – 7:30 pm
Saturday 8:00 am – 4:00 pm
Boarding pick ups and drop offs will be between 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Sunday:  10:00 am – 3 pm
Boarding pick ups and drop offs will be between 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

How Do Dogs Get Ebola?

Dogs and other animals pick up Ebola from consuming infected meat, direct contact with infectious fluids such as urine, feces.

Dogs are kept as pets and for hunting in Africa but are not typically fed, therefore they scavenge and ingest infected meat or residue from infected people. The very detailed CDC study found evidence of infection in dogs by testing hundreds of blood samples for antibodies.

What are Symptoms of Ebola in Dogs?

The CDC concluded that infected dogs are asymptomatic (do not develop symptoms) from Ebola. During the initial time of their infection, however, they can spread the disease to humans and other animals through licking, biting, grooming, saliva, tears, urine, and feces. However, once the virus is cleared from the dog it is no longer contagious. Dogs do not die from Ebola infections.

Can MY Dog Get Ebola?

In the United States and areas of the world not contiguous to the affected countries in central Africa, the chances of contracting Ebola are extremely low.

The virus is spread mainly in the current prevalent areas where the lifestyle is far different from ours. There is no known source of infection outside of affected areas in Africa. In our country, and most countries with more stringent rules concerning food production and sanitation, our pets should be protected as well as we are from this type of catastrophic disease. – See more at: http://www.petplace.com/dogs/ebola-virus-can-your-dog-get-it/page1.aspx?utm_source=Newsletters&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Ebola&utm_content=DL-20140912%20(1)#sthash.oc79ZEa6.dpuf


How Do Dogs Get Ebola?

Dogs and other animals pick up Ebola from consuming infected meat, direct contact with infectious fluids such as urine, feces.

Dogs are kept as pets and for hunting in Africa but are not typically fed, therefore they scavenge and ingest infected meat or residue from infected people. The very detailed CDC study found evidence of infection in dogs by testing hundreds of blood samples for antibodies.

What are Symptoms of Ebola in Dogs?

The CDC concluded that infected dogs are asymptomatic (do not develop symptoms) from Ebola. During the initial time of their infection, however, they can spread the disease to humans and other animals through licking, biting, grooming, saliva, tears, urine, and feces. However, once the virus is cleared from the dog it is no longer contagious. Dogs do not die from Ebola infections.

Can MY Dog Get Ebola?

In the United States and areas of the world not contiguous to the affected countries in central Africa, the chances of contracting Ebola are extremely low.

The virus is spread mainly in the current prevalent areas where the lifestyle is far different from ours. There is no known source of infection outside of affected areas in Africa. In our country, and most countries with more stringent rules concerning food production and sanitation, our pets should be protected as well as we are from this type of catastrophic disease. – See more at: http://www.petplace.com/dogs/ebola-virus-can-your-dog-get-it/page1.aspx?utm_source=Newsletters&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Ebola&utm_content=DL-20140912%20(1)#sthash.oc79ZEa6.dpuf

Will the snow and cold temperatures ever end?
dog1Because we have a max capacity of dogs per day, you can rest easy knowing that your pup will receive plenty of personal attention and loving care. All of our staff are certified in canine first aid and CPR, fully insured, and trained in safety protocols!
Do you spend long hours each day away at work only to return home to a moping dog?
For busy pet owners, finding a doggie day care center where pets can be cared for and loved can be a daunting task. You need a facility that provides a safe and secure environment where dogs will thrive.
You want animal caregivers that are not only professionally trained, but will treat your dogs with genuine affection. You want a place where dogs have sufficient social interaction, stimulation, and exercise to keep those furry tails wagging happily.
Fortunately for dog owners, the Animal Hospital of Polaris offers all this and more. We are the premier dog day care facility inthe Central Ohio area. Owners have had nothing but praises for our staff and services since we opened our doors in in 2002–and we know that the dogs feel the same.

$25 referral bonus for you and your referred client!
Thank you for trusting Animal Hospital of Polaris with your family pet!  We hope you’ll share what we do with others. Animal Hospital of Polaris offers a referral bonus for those existing clients who refer their friends, family or co-workers to our practice.  We offer a $25.00 Account Credit on both the referring client’s account as well as for the new client.
Please note that the referring client may utilize their $25.00 account credit for any product or service; however, the referred (new) client may only utilize their credit for clinical services.  In addition, the new client must complete a referral card at the time of service.  No coupon is needed to take advantage of this offer.  Thanks again for choosing Animal Hospital of Polaris!

8 Holiday Pet-Proofing Tips

December 4, 2013

ImageHere’s a question that I get asked often this time of the year: How do you keep all those pets of yours out of trouble?

It’s a great question when you’ve got tinsel, glittery ornaments and all holiday trappings decking your halls, walls and — most menacingly of all — your holiday tree (if you happen to have one).

The answer to this perfectly reasonable query: I’m really into decorating my home with all kinds of oddball stuff — even more so during the holidays — so I’m well aware that the secret to keeping pets out of trouble is to understand that there is no 100 percent risk-free environment. You also need to assess and prioritize the risks your household presents, find your pets’ risk-taking tendencies and work to strategically lower the most dangerous risks to individual pets.

You can make yourself crazy trying to pet-proof your home for every possible risk — and you’re unlikely to get rid of every possible danger. That’s just life. I’ve seen dogs drown in their water bowls and choke on perfectly “safe” collars and restraints. But I understand why it may be useful to hear what a veterinarian might do to pet-proof her own abode. So here’s my list of must-dos.

1. Elevate the Holiday Tree

Put the tree in a tall pot or up on a high pedestal to make it harder for pets to tip the tree over, drink the water (sometimes cited as a toxic issue) or take an interest in low-hanging decorations. (It goes without saying that all decorations should be out of an animal’s reach.)

I’ve used a tall pot for the past couple of years, which brings me to my next tip.

2. Stabilize and Secure Your Decor

Whatever decorations you put up, go the extra mile and make them inaccessible to pets. Whether it’s lodging the tree in a sturdy position (a standard tree stand will not work if you’ve got a sufficiently motivated cat) or tacking wreaths and garlands securely, the idea is to keep stuff in a spot that won’t be accessible to your playful pets.

3. Don’t Buy Dangerous Stuff

Why take the risk with real mistletoe (reportedly toxic), yarn, ribbon or tinsel?

4. Purchase Nontoxic Stuff Instead

I use silver duct tape in place of ribbons, 100 percent nontoxic native trees in place of pines (pine oil has been reported to cause liver damage in some pets) and recyclable paper ornaments (origami is fun to learn). Sure, paper isn’t as shiny, but it’s classy — and one less thing to tempt pets.

5. Prevent the Pee-Pee Problem

Pet proofing for the holidays isn’t just about pets. Sometimes the goal is to keep humans from suffering the slings and arrows of outrageous urine. I have a dog who (this has been confirmed by multiple trainers) cannot be housebroken. Anything low — like a holiday tree — must be raised, so he doesn’t decide it’s worth marking.

6. Embrace Crates

This time of year, I’m even more of a sucker for crates — and I’m always a stickler when it comes to crating my dogs for safety reasons. To keep my cuties from running amok and headlong into danger, I keep them close. Since I spend 80 percent of my waking life in the kitchen, I drag the crates into that space and let them watch me do my thing.

7. Conceal Electric Cords

I’ve had two pets chew through them, and I’ve seen plenty of burned mouths as a result of electric shock, so I’m vigilant about keeping pets away from cords. Covering them with heavy-duty plastic liners helps, but during the holidays I’ve taken to using twinkly indoor lights powered by batteries. There’s only so much damage a pet can do chewing through these.

8. Keep Pets Away From Chocolate

Safety is all well and good, but here’s where I draw the line: Chocolate is a holiday must-have for me. So I’m very careful with the dark chocolate that’s included in probably 20 percent of my homemade holiday treats. Sure, chocolate is toxic, but here’s where knowing when to be careful is more than half the battle: In all my years of pet keeping and dark chocolate wielding, I’ve never had an incident.

Getting old is not fun!

October 7, 2013

When we bring home a new puppy (or even adopt an older dog), we are excited to add a new member family and never consider that they, too, will grow old one day.  Every dog ages differently, but there are a few changes that veterinarians tend to see in older dogs. Some of these common signs of canine aging include:older dogs

  • Hearing loss:   As dogs age, the nerve cells and hearing apparatus degenerates, resulting in a slow loss of hearing.
  • Vision loss:   The lens of the eye becomes cloudy with age. Natural changes result in lenticular sclerosis, which typically does not cause significant vision loss. However, cataracts may develop, which also interferes with vision.
  • Decreased activity:   As dogs age, their metabolic rate slows and as a result, they become less active.
  • Weight gain:   Elderly dogs require 30 to 40 percent fewer calories. So simply eating a normal maintenance diet, often causes obesity.
  • Infections:   As the body ages, the immune system weakens, making it harder for your dog to ward off infections.

All of these changes are common as dogs age and with careful attention from a loving owner, they are easy to manage. It’s very important to maintain good routine care in your dog’s golden years and have your dog evaluated twice annually by the veterinarian.

Additional pet food recall…

September 17, 2013

Purina One dry dog food is being voluntarily recalled because of potential salmonella contamination as reported by Nestle Purina Petcare, the manufacturer of this product. Products affected include the 3.5 pound bags of White Meat Chicken & Whole Barley Recipe Adult dry dog food (these packages are further identified with an expiration date of October 2014 and the production code of 31071083).royal canon

We still maintain that the Royal Canin label of food is far superior given their rigorous commitment to quality and consumer protection.  We understand you have choices when it comes to what to feed your pet but we also know you want the best for your pet.

Stop by or call us today to discuss more about your pet’s nutritional needs and how to keep them happy and healthy!

Is it time for a nail trim for your pet?

September 12, 2013

Your pet’s nails are a vital part of their anatomy. They help your pet walk and run, explore and play. And if they aren’t taken care of properly, their nails can cause a host of problems ranging from mild discomfort to punctures or even joint and bone problems.

pet nail trimThis can easily be prevented by keeping your pet’s nails trimmed. The question is, how frequently do you need to do it? The answer depends on multiple factors. The average range of time for trimming a pet’s nails is anywhere between three to even eight weeks.

Two things that affect your pet’s nail trimming schedule are their location and their breed. The more active that a dog is, the less frequent their nail trims might be. Walking on rough surfaces can grind down the nail so city dogs and dogs that frequently walk on sidewalks and asphalt often need less frequent trimming. Dogs who spend little time outside typically need more frequent trims.

In addition, some breeds and individuals have nails which grow faster than the average; for example, Dachshunds and Bassets may need to have their nails trimmed more often.

A good rule of thumb is that if you can hear your pet’s nails “click” when he walks, they need to be trimmed. You should also keep an eye out for any changes in your pet’s walk as this might also indicate foot pain from lengthy nails.

Trimming your pet’s nails is important to his comfort and good health. Overgrown nails can cause problems like:

•  Ingrown nails

•  Torn bleeding nails

•  Splayed toes (deformed feet)

•  Bone and joint problems

•  Hip and back problems

Trimming your pet’s nails is a must. But often, it is a stressful and unpleasant task for both you and your pet. We asked pet owners to tell us what they dislike most about trimming their dog’s nails. Here’s what we learned.

•  Most people said their pet makes it difficult. Whether the pet is scared or simply uncooperative, it was hard to safely trim their nails while struggling to restrain them.

•  Pain and bleeding are a common complaint. There is a blood vessel running through your pet’s nails called the quick. It is easy to see on light-colored nails  and somewhat harder on dark-colored ones. When you cut into the quick, the nail bleeds. This is painful for your pet and it can also be a little scary for the pet owner.

•  Painful cuts make pets fearful of nail trimming. Just one bad experience can make a pet struggle and resist, turning a tough job even tougher. Some pets hate having their nails trimmed so much that they actually bite their owners.

It’s not surprising that most pet owners would rather not cut their pet’s nails and prefer visiting a groomer.  Print out this message and receive $5.00 off your pet’s nail trim!  Call us today at 614-888-4050 to schedule an appointment for your pet’s nail trim!

 

Pet Poisoning Prevention

August 27, 2013

Poisoning cases are some of the most common reasons for visits to veterinary emergency clinics. Nearly every day, we field a call or see a patient that has eaten something they shouldn’t and must then receive life-saving treatment.Pet Poisons

It’s even worse when you realize that most of these incidents are completely preventable. It doesn’t have to be like this. Most of the time owners don’t even realize that their homes contain so many toxic items. Some of the most toxic items include:

Household cleaners, bleach, Lysol and other corrosives… why? 

Because household cleaners can cause very serious “chemical burns”.  Most often, these chemicals are ingested or licked, causing a caustic or corrosive burn usually affecting the tongue and esophagus. 

Aspirin…why?

Aspirin interferes with platelets, which are responsible for helping the blood to clot.  Aspirin toxicity can lead to gastrointestinal problems, respiratory difficulties, neurological problems, bleeding disorders and kidney failure.

Antifreeze…why?

Ethylene glycol (antifreeze) is extremely toxic for pets and has potentially lethal effects…even a small dose can be lethal within a few hours of ingestion.  

Amphetamines…why?

If left untreated, amphetamine toxicity can be fatal in your pet.  These classification of drugs affect your pet’s nervous system and brain.  Toxic signs are typically visible within 1-2 hours.

While this list is not exhaustive, it does cover some of the more common substances that are particularly harmful to your pet.  If you are ever in doubt about your pet’s exposure to these and other potentially harmful products, don’t hesitate to contact us at (614) 888-4050.