Archive for May, 2013

Lyme Disease…it can affect your pet and your family… but you can protect both!

May 15, 2013

Lyme disease is a serious condition that affects dogs and humans and ticks are the number one carrier of Lyme Disease.  Dogs infected with Lyme disease may develop problems like joint swelling, lethargy, lameness, and fever two to five months after the tick bite.ticks

Occasionally, Lyme disease can cause a heart or nervous system problem in your dog. Rarely, kidney failure can occur. If you think your dog has been exposed to ticks, ask your veterinarian for a blood test to detect the antibodies, and, if positive, regular blood tests to monitor Lyme disease titers should be performed.

The good news is that, nine out of ten dogs exposed to the bacteria do not go on to develop Lyme disease.

However, it’s not as rosy a picture for humans. Symptoms resembling the flu can start days or weeks after the infection, and there may be a rash. These symptoms can come and go and, unfortunately, rarely be connected with Lyme disease.

Left untreated, Lyme disease can spread to your brain, heart, and joints. Many people are now discovering that the muscle and joint pain, numbness and tingling, insomnia, memory problems, and a host of other symptoms that they’ve suffered with for years may actually be related to a tick bite they got decades ago.

So, if your dog will be going outdoors this spring and summer (and most dogs spend time outside even if it is just for their daily walk), then you need to protect him and yourself from disease carrying ticks.

The best way to keep ticks – and potential Lyme disease- out of your home is by giving your pet high quality flea and tick prevention medication.  In addition, your dog should receive the Lyme Disease vaccine.  The vaccine is administered in a 2-part dose for the regular price of $60; however, throughout the month of May, your dog can receive both vaccine dosages for a total of $40 and the exam fee is waived.  Call us today to schedule your dog’s appointment and help to protect your pet and your family!

Remember that we are open late and on the weekends to help care for your pet:
Monday – Friday:  7:30 AM – 10 PM
Saturday:  8 AM – 8 PM
Sunday:  10 AM – 8 PM

Your friends @ the Animal Hospital of Polaris
8928 South Old State Road
Lewis Center, Ohio  43035
614-888-4050

 

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Hard to believe flea and tick season is upon us…but we have a great, new solution to protecting your pets!

May 10, 2013
Seresto is the newest breakthrough in flea and tick prevention for your pets! Easier than monthly topicals, you simply apply Seresto to your pet just once and they enjoy 8 months of protection from fleas and ticks!  Seresto is a revolutionary new flea and tick collar that releases two active ingredients in controlled doses over time to protect your pet.  The cost is also impressive… throughout the month of May, the cost of the Seresto collar is just $69.99 with a $20.00 rebate.  Stop in today to purchase this protection for your furry friend!
These black-legged ticks, Ixodes scapularis, a...

Flea bites can cause skin lesions, hot spots, hair loss and even anemia. Not only is the condition dangerous and uncomfortable for your pet, a single flea can lay up to 50 eggs a day causing a full-out infestation in your home before you know it.

Dogs are also common targets for ticks that can transmit serious diseases when they feed on your dog’s blood. A few of the most dangerous conditions:

  • Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever
  • Ehrlichiad
  • Lyme Disease

Remember that we are open late and on the weekends
to help care for your pet:

Monday – Friday:  7:30 AM – 10 PM
Saturday:  8 AM – 8 PM
Sunday:  10 AM – 8 PM

Your friends @ the Animal Hospital of Polaris
www.animalhospitalofpolaris.com
8928 South Old State Road
Lewis Center, Ohio  43035
614-888-4050

 

Be prepared… what you need to know for pet first aid kit and how to build one!

May 9, 2013

pet first aidMost of us have a first aid kit for humans either in our car or our home…or both. But have you ever considered having a first aid kit handy for treating your pets?  If you don’t have a first aid kit for your pets in your household, now is a good time to get one, or you can easily build one.  You can start with a first aid kit built for humans and then consider adding the following items:

  • A fresh, unexpired bottle of 3% hydrogen peroxide. This isn’t for cleaning wounds necessarily, but rather for inducing vomiting if your dog gets into something poisonous! Accidental poisonings in our pets occur thousands of times a day across the world, so you always want to be prepared to induce vomiting if necessary. That said, never induce vomiting without consulting your veterinarian or Pet Poison Helpline (800-213-6680, an animal poison control first), as it may make your pet worse.
  • A bottle of liquid dish soap (e.g., Dawn, Joy, etc.). Most households already have a bottle of liquid dish soap handy but ensuring you have enough for emergencies is critical. For example, if your cat accidentally had a dog flea and tick medication put on it, you’ll need to bath off this chemical immediately to prevent tremors and seizures. Likewise, if your pet rolled in something poisonous (like motor oil, etc.), you can safely administer a bath with liquid dish soap.
  • A can of canned tuna (in water) or a can of chicken broth. You’re probably wondering why this needs to be in a first aid kit. Well, several plants (e.g., Dieffenbachia, Poinsettias, etc.), household products (e.g., glow sticks) and household cleaners can cause severe foaming and drooling of the mouth due to irritation. By simply diluting the taste or chemical out of your pet’s mouth with something tasty (like the water from the tuna), it can safely flush out the mouth and esophagus. This is much safer than using a spray or hose to flush out the taste from your pet’s mouth, as there is a chance your pet could aspirate that fluid into their lungs.
  • A few cans of dog or cat food and bottles of water. As the nightly news tells us, disasters can strike anywhere so you need a “pet bag to go” in case of emergency. Making sure that you have pop-off lid canned food is important in case you need to feed your pet during a disaster. Don’t use dry kibble (which can go rancid after years) or cans that require a can opener (since you’re unlikely to remember to grab your can opener on the run!).
  • A quart size bag full of kitty litter. Again, you never know when you have to evacuate quickly with your pet. Keeping a bag of kitty litter in your first aid kit or in your cat carrier is imperative in case you’re on the run.

As time and circumstances have taught us, we can’t predict when disaster or tragedy strikes but attempting to be prepared (and keep the first aid materials in a box with a copy of the notes above so you know what to do in instances of illness or injury) will do much to help treat your pet at home, prevent costly veterinary treatments and possibly save your pet’s life.